diigo Hub

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--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • The worship of speed reflected and promoted a profound shift in cultural values that occurred with the advent of modernity and modernization.
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor took his stopwatch to the factory floor in the early 20th century to increase workers’ efficiency, he began a high-speed culture of surveillance so memorably depicted in Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times.
  • Moore’s Law, according to which the speed of computer chips doubles every two years, now seems to apply to life itself. Plugged in 24/7/365, we are constantly struggling to keep up but are always falling further behind
  • During the era Thorstein Veblen so vividly described in The Theory of the Leisure Class, social status was measured by how little a person worked; today it is often measured by how much a person works. If you are not constantly connected, you are unimportant; if you willingly unplug to recuperate, play, or even do nothing, you become an expendable slacker.
  • With the advent of Big Data and high-speed computers and networks, where more than 70 percent of the trades are algorithmically executed
  • Though the importance of high-speed, high-volume trading is widely acknowledged, its political and social implications have not been adequately understood. The much-discussed wealth gap is, in fact, a speed gap.
  • There are only three ways markets can expand to keep the economy growing: spatially—build new factories and open new stores in new places; differentially—create an endless variety of new products for consumers to buy; and temporally—accelerate the product cycle
  • The highly touted virtues of innovation and disruption are merely the latest version of Joseph Schumpeter’s "creative destruction," which advocated growing the economy by accelerating obsolescence
  • speed has made location more important than ever.
  • High-speed, high-volume markets have created unprecedented wealth for the .01 percent, but, as the 2008 financial meltdown and the 2010 Flash Crash demonstrate, they have also made the global economy much more volatile
  • the problem is that the entire system rests on values that have become distorted
  • If psychological, social, economic, and ecological meltdowns are to be avoided, we need what Nietzsche aptly labeled a "transvaluation of values."
  • People often ask me how higher education and students have changed in the four decades I have been teaching. While there is no simple answer, the most important changes can be organized under five headings: hyperspecialization, quantification, distraction, acceleration, and vocationalization
  • echnologies that were designed to connect us and bring people closer together also create deep social, political, and economic divisions. The proliferation of media outlets has led to mass customization, which allows individuals and isolated groups of individuals to receive personalized news feeds that seal them in bubbles with little knowledge of, or concern about, other points of view. This trend also infects higher education
  • a culture of expertise in which scholars, who know more and more about less and less, spend their professional lives talking to other scholars with similar interests who have little interest in the world around them.
  • The emergence of the Internet creates the possibility of eroding these barriers and breaking down divisive silos, but the vested interests of nervous administrators and tenured faculty members committed to obsolete ways of organizing knowledge and teaching have blocked that promising prospect
  • The growing concern about the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education has led to a preoccupation with the evaluation of students and teachers.
  • When people believe that what cannot be measured is not real, education and, by extension society, loses its soul.
  • the knowledge that matters cannot be programmed, and creativity cannot be rushed but must be cultivated slowly and patiently
  • There is a growing body of evidence that people read and write differently online. Once again the crucial variable is speed.
  • Researchers have discovered what they describe as an "F-shaped pattern" for reading web content, in which as people read down a page, they scan fewer and fewer words in a line.
  • bscurity, ambiguity, and uncertainty, which are the lifeblood of art, literature, and philosophy, be
  • The preoccupation with what seems to be practical and useful in the marketplace has led to a decline in the perceived value of the arts and humanities, which many people now regard as impractical luxuries.
  • Young people must learn that memory cannot be outsourced to machines, and short-term solutions to long-term problems are never enough. Above all, educators are responsible for teaching students how to think critically and creatively about the values that guide their lives and inform society as a whole.

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • . It also represents an important challenge to the academic freedom of professors to conduct their courses as they deem appropriate.
  • Proponents of the assessment movement contend that more-precise measures of the impact of a program or course on student learning are needed to allow comparisons among programs and courses.
  • what is the push toward assessment, competencies, and learning outcomes really about? The answer to this question lies not in pedagogy but in politics or, more precisely, in the politics of pedagogy
  • a one-two punch to higher education as a relatively independent social institution
  • First comes a rollback effect
  • This forces a cost-cutting frenzy
  • Next come efforts to compensate for the resulting loss of quality
  • This leads to more administrators to oversee the "quality-control systems
  • . This continues until you end up with virtual, low-faculty models such as those found at Capella’s Flexpath or Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America where the faculty has been largely eliminated

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • . It also represents an important challenge to the academic freedom of professors to conduct their courses as they deem appropriate.
  • Proponents of the assessment movement contend that more-precise measures of the impact of a program or course on student learning are needed to allow comparisons among programs and courses.
  • what is the push toward assessment, competencies, and learning outcomes really about? The answer to this question lies not in pedagogy but in politics or, more precisely, in the politics of pedagogy
  • a one-two punch to higher education as a relatively independent social institution
  • First comes a rollback effect
  • This forces a cost-cutting frenzy
  • Next come efforts to compensate for the resulting loss of quality
  • This leads to more administrators to oversee the "quality-control systems
  • . This continues until you end up with virtual, low-faculty models such as those found at Capella’s Flexpath or Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America where the faculty has been largely eliminated

Tags:

0 0

--Originally published at t509massive on Diigo

Annotations:
  • . It also represents an important challenge to the academic freedom of professors to conduct their courses as they deem appropriate.
  • Proponents of the assessment movement contend that more-precise measures of the impact of a program or course on student learning are needed to allow comparisons among programs and courses.
  • what is the push toward assessment, competencies, and learning outcomes really about? The answer to this question lies not in pedagogy but in politics or, more precisely, in the politics of pedagogy
  • a one-two punch to higher education as a relatively independent social institution
  • First comes a rollback effect
  • This forces a cost-cutting frenzy
  • Next come efforts to compensate for the resulting loss of quality
  • This leads to more administrators to oversee the "quality-control systems
  • . This continues until you end up with virtual, low-faculty models such as those found at Capella’s Flexpath or Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America where the faculty has been largely eliminated

Tags: