Syndicated

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--Originally published at The Noble Leisure Project

It has become eminently clear that the learning in this class (and all others but one I am taking here at Harvard) transpires, to a great degree, in a language I do not understand.  Far from demoralized, I am excited about learning this new language – the language of my children, my students and my fellow classmates – and using it to communicate my ideas in a meaningful and impactful way.

 

Of course, I am referring to the language of modern technology, specifically, social media.  My aim then is first, to understand the tools themselves, their purpose and best use; second, to match my ideas with the tool best suited to reaching and impacting my intended audience; third, to become proficient in the use of these tools through practice, in order that it becomes a habit (thank you, Aristotle).

 

Proficiency in “blogging” and “tweeting” appear central to my goals.  Of these, blogging addresses another need, i.e., to communicate my ideas and mere reflections in a more timely and accessible manner, in contrast to the painstaking, time consuming scholarly and philosophical writing to which I am accustomed and with which I am most comfortable.

 

My overarching goal for this course is to gain the knowledge and skills that will support The Noble Leisure Project.  My intended audience is likely, for the most part, to be in the same boat as I am with respect to technology and social media; instructing and supporting those who will ultimately participate in the program will be central to its success.

 

And so, I intend to blog once a week in response to the readings, class meetings, additional research or personal experiences (including my successes, failures and discoveries navigating the technology and using social media).  I will need to develop a discipline for this (a particular day, so much time devoted to the activity, etc.).  The goal is to contribute something relevant and meaningful; something that advances my own learning and that of my classmates.  It is likely that I will miss the mark on occasion, and the comments (if any) in response to what I post will be one measure of my performance.

 

  Exceeds Expectations MeetsExpectations Underperforms Expectations
 Quantitative Criteria Posting one blog per week plus something additional  Posting one blog per week Posting less than nine blogs over the remainder of the course
 Qualitative Criteria Posting something truly meaningful, as evidenced by one or more comments Posting something relevant, whether or not producing comments Posting something perfunctory or uninspired (producing no comments or critical comments) 

 

 

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--Originally published at The Noble Leisure Project

It has become eminently clear that the learning in this class (and all others but one I am taking here at Harvard) transpires, to a great degree, in a language I do not understand.  Far from demoralized, I am excited about learning this new language – the language of my children, my students and my fellow classmates – and using it to communicate my ideas in a meaningful and impactful way.

 

Of course, I am referring to the language of modern technology, specifically, social media.  My aim then is first, to understand the tools themselves, their purpose and best use; second, to match my ideas with the tool best suited to reaching and impacting my intended audience; third, to become proficient in the use of these tools through practice, in order that it becomes a habit (thank you, Aristotle).

 

Proficiency in “blogging” and “tweeting” appear central to my goals.  Of these, blogging addresses another need, i.e., to communicate my ideas and mere reflections in a more timely and accessible manner, in contrast to the painstaking, time consuming scholarly and philosophical writing to which I am accustomed and with which I am most comfortable.

 

My overarching goal for this course is to gain the knowledge and skills that will support The Noble Leisure Project.  My intended audience is likely, for the most part, to be in the same boat as I am with respect to technology and social media; instructing and supporting those who will ultimately participate in the program will be central to its success.

 

And so, I intend to blog once a week in response to the readings, class meetings, additional research or personal experiences (including my successes, failures and discoveries navigating the technology and using social media).  I will need to develop a discipline for this (a particular day, so much time devoted to the activity, etc.).  The goal is to contribute something relevant and meaningful; something that advances my own learning and that of my classmates.  It is likely that I will miss the mark on occasion, and the comments (if any) in response to what I post will be one measure of my performance.

 

  Exceeds Expectations MeetsExpectations Underperforms Expectations
 Quantitative Criteria Posting one blog per week plus something additional  Posting one blog per week Posting less than nine blogs over the remainder of the course
 Qualitative Criteria Posting something truly meaningful, as evidenced by one or more comments Posting something relevant, whether or not producing comments Posting something perfunctory or uninspired (producing no comments or critical comments) 

 

 

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--Originally published at The Noble Leisure Project

It has become eminently clear that the learning in this class (and all others but one I am taking here at Harvard) transpires, to a great degree, in a language I do not understand.  Far from demoralized, I am excited about learning this new language – the language of my children, my students and my fellow classmates – and using it to communicate my ideas in a meaningful and impactful way.

 

Of course, I am referring to the language of modern technology, specifically, social media.  My aim then is first, to understand the tools themselves, their purpose and best use; second, to match my ideas with the tool best suited to reaching and impacting my intended audience; third, to become proficient in the use of these tools through practice, in order that it becomes a habit (thank you, Aristotle).

 

Proficiency in “blogging” and “tweeting” appear central to my goals.  Of these, blogging addresses another need, i.e., to communicate my ideas and mere reflections in a more timely and accessible manner, in contrast to the painstaking, time consuming scholarly and philosophical writing to which I am accustomed and with which I am most comfortable.

 

My overarching goal for this course is to gain the knowledge and skills that will support The Noble Leisure Project.  My intended audience is likely, for the most part, to be in the same boat as I am with respect to technology and social media; instructing and supporting those who will ultimately participate in the program will be central to its success.

 

And so, I intend to blog once a week in response to the readings, class meetings, additional research or personal experiences (including my successes, failures and discoveries navigating the technology and using social media).  I will need to develop a discipline for this (a particular day, so much time devoted to the activity, etc.).  The goal is to contribute something relevant and meaningful; something that advances my own learning and that of my classmates.  It is likely that I will miss the mark on occasion, and the comments (if any) in response to what I post will be one measure of my performance.

 

  Exceeds Expectations MeetsExpectations Underperforms Expectations
 Quantitative Criteria Posting one blog per week plus something additional  Posting one blog per week Posting less than nine blogs over the remainder of the course
 Qualitative Criteria Posting something truly meaningful, as evidenced by one or more comments Posting something relevant, whether or not producing comments Posting something perfunctory or uninspired (producing no comments or critical comments) 

 

 

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--Originally published at Rachel's Ramblings

My first blog for T509 focused on procrastination. That was my initial assessment for why I’ve resisted blogging. I just kept running out of time. However, as this thought has rolled around my brain for a few days, I’ve realized my procrastination of blogging was fueled by something completely different. It’s fueled by my fear of putting myself “out there”. I mean, what if I say something totally wrong? What if I’m scrutinized for my opinions? What if I have provocative thoughts or opinions? How might this impact me now? Or much later in the future? For better or worse, I work in a fairly small industry and my current position is on a quasi-visible platform in a smallish non-profit world. Will my comments be interpreted as a representative of the organization I work for? Or how might those thoughts that I share today impact my future opportunities for advancement? I recognize that in Wednesday’s class we discussed that very few people have such a judgmental lens on our blogged words, and typically the most critical voice on our contributions is the one inside our own head. However, I have watched other professionals have their words used against them, sometimes years after the fact and usually out of the context meant by their initial intent. I absolutely enjoy lively debates and conversations with people – yet there is something very real and intimidating to me about having my words in a wide open space, accessible to anyone, anytime. FOREVER.

This personal discovery sheds more light on what I aim to achieve in this class. In addition to gaining tools for better understanding online learning environments, I also wish to dig into the complexities of this – understanding, thinking about, and curating the representation that each of us put forward on our individual blog contributions. What are successful models? Why are they successful? What happens to unsuccessful models? Or if something spins out of control, how is damage control managed?

I’m also curious to explore much more about MOOC’s, specifically around individual motivations. During class on Wednesday, I started considering motivations. Previously, I had assumed that the purpose of any course was for the transference of information from the teacher to the learner. The teacher isn’t necessarily the figurehead of the class, but rather can be anyone with knowledge that another individual does not have, and that individual with knowledge is willing and able to share the concept with others. Yet when considering MOOC’s, the motivation of a learner is extreme. Previously, I had assumed that a learner would want to gain as much information as possible to promote their own individual advancement. However, is this really the case? Look at attrition rates within MOOC’s – they range from someone who is totally invested in the course to someone who only signs up as a passing interest, potentially earmarking it for later when their own procrastination subsides. In understanding these individual and varied motivations, are there ways that a MOOC can encourage further participation and engagement to increase the efficacy of every individual learner?

While not a single one of us can predict the future, I do commit to putting myself out there for the good of learning in T509. It’s going to be a personal stretch, specifically in tackling said fears, but I’ll do my best to get over it and put myself out there. How? Here’s a beginning:

  • BLOG POSTS: My goal with blog posts is two-fold: (1) I’d like to post at least twice a week for the remainder of the semester, and (2) I’d like to find a way to write honestly about my thoughts / opinions without fear.
    • I’d exceed expectations if: I posted twice weekly and felt committed to what I was writing, regardless of what others might think about my opinions.
    • I’d meet expectations if: I posted twice weekly, but some of my posts were seemingly pc and generic because I couldn’t find a way to address my fear that week.
    • I’d fall short of my expectations if: I failed to post twice weekly and most of my posts weren’t engaging in any way.
  • TWEETING: I still feel overwhelmed with Twitter. To me, every time I sign on it’s as if I’m forcing my head under a fire-hose of information with no chance for air until I’ve read every single thing. My goal for using Twitter is to find a way to take in information, and let go of the need to consume all the information out in the Twittersphere.
    • I’d exceed expectations if: I let go of the need to consume everything and develop the courage to sign on to Twitter daily, reading a few tweets of interest and posting my own contribution daily.
    • I’d meet expectations if: I mostly let go of the need to consume everything on Twitter, and post 3-5 times weekly.
    • I’d fall short of my expectations if: I only signed on to Twitter and posted 1-2 times weekly.
  • IN-CLASS PARTICIPATION: I’m typically a students that is incredibly engaged by extremely quiet in large forums. Ironically, I was the first participant called on to speak in T509 this fall, and I could feel my face turn bright red as I responded. Regardless, I’d like to commit to speaking up more in class. without so much self-censoring hesitation.
    • I’d exceed expectations if: I felt comfortable and confident raising my hand and/or finding a way to contribute during each class that we have remaining.
    • I’d meet expectations if: I only contributed sometimes, when I felt very passionate about an idea or concept.
    • I’d fall short of my expectations if: I only contributed in the small-group discussions and failed to speak up in our large group forums.
  • ONLINE EXPLORATIONS: Since this is the first time that I’ve committed to being active in and exploring online forums, I’d like to go down as many rabbit holes as possible to dig into new ideas, opportunities, and forums that contribute to online learning experiences. I don’t know what this will entail exactly, and will need refinement, but for starters …
    • I’d exceed expectations if: I was able to consistently share and/or raise awareness about articles, forums, and/or online platforms that could contribute to the class learning
    • I’d meet expectations if: I contributed only a few (5-6) outside ideas throughout the course of the semester.
    • I’d fall short of my expectations if: I didn’t make this a priority of my learning at all.

 


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--Originally published at shamajamal

Personal Compass There is tremendous opportunity for the growth of learning technologies, however, I don't have a clear opinion or understanding on whether this will be an equitable and high-quality option for children anywhere in the world. I hope that this course and the independent project will help me form an informed opinion. Participation Commitments Within the T509 learning community, I hope to challenge myself to reflect on the core concepts discussed within class and online. I want to

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--Originally published at shamajamal

Personal Compass
There is tremendous opportunity for the growth of learning technologies, however, I don't have a clear opinion or understanding on whether this will be an equitable and high-quality option for children anywhere in the world. I hope that this course and the independent project will help me form an informed opinion.
Participation Commitments
Within the T509 learning community, I hope to challenge myself to reflect on the core concepts discussed within class and online. I want to frequently write blogs, provide feedback on other blogs, share resources and engage with others. Beyond the classroom, through monthly discussions and speaker events, I also want to open up the floor for education and non-education practitioners within the Harvard community planning to work in Sub Saharan Africa to form and opinion about this matter.

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--Originally published at shamajamal

Personal Compass There is tremendous opportunity for the growth of learning technologies, however, I don't have a clear opinion or understanding on whether this will be an equitable and high-quality option for children anywhere in the world. I hope that this course and the independent project will help me form an informed opinion. Participation Commitments Within the T509 learning community, I hope to challenge myself to reflect on the core concepts discussed within class and online. I want to